07 May in the Histo...
 
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07 May in the History of Psychology

 

Aamir Ranjha
(@aamir)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1312
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On May 7:

1711 — David Hume was born. Hume was an empiricist and associationist whose An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding is a classic treatise on the relation between sense experience and ideas, the role of contiguity in relating ideas, and the nature of the idea of causation.

1841 — Gustave Le Bon was born. Le Bon was a sociologist who influenced social psychology through his theory of the "crowd mind" as an explanation of the shared and uninhibited behavior of individuals in large groups. His book, The Crowd (1895) was an international best seller and represented an early attempt at a scientific explanation of social behavior.

1883 — Mabel Ruth Fernald was born. Her work was in the area of mental deficiency, imagery, and memory.

1937 — The Midwestern Psychological Association (MPA) voted to petition the APA for affiliated organization status. A May 12, 1937, letter from MPA Secretary-Treasurer Arthur G. Bills presented the petition. The action was approved by the APA on September 8, 1938.

1945 — G. Frederick Kuder's Personal Reaction Survey, the first version of the Kuder Preference Record, was published. The Kuder Preference Record has remained a standard occupational interest survey.

1971 — The APA Monitor announced that the membership had approved the revised Albee system of voting for members of the APA Council of Representatives. The system calls for members to allocate 10 votes among division and state representatives.

1971 — The APA Monitor reported the first meeting of the Association for Women in Psychology in early 1971. No traditional officers were elected, but Joan Berman, chair of the External Communications Committee, provided the report.

1990 — Jonathan Shedler and Jack Block's article "Adolescent Drug Use and Psychological Health: A Longitudinal Inquiry" was published in the American Psychologist. The article was frequently cited in other publications in the early 1990s.


   
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