Vincenzo conducts a...
 
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Vincenzo conducts an experiment to see whether fear makes mice run through mazes faster. He first selected a sample of 60 mice and then divided them into a control group and an experimental group. Which cannot be a confounding variable?

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(@aamir)
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Vincenzo conducts an experiment to see whether fear makes mice run through mazes faster. He first selected a sample of 60 mice and then divided them into a control group and an experimental group. Which cannot be a confounding variable?

(A) How fast the mice are at the start.
(B) When the mice run the maze.
(C) The population from which he selected his subjects.
(D) How frightened the mice are before the experiment.
(E) Where the mice run the maze.

Spoiler
Answer
(C) The population from which he selected his subjects.

Spoiler
Explanation
A confounding variable is anything that differs between the control and experimental group besides the independent variable. How fast and frightened the mice are at the onset of the experiment are potential participant-relevant confounding variables. When and where the experiment takes place are possible situation-relevant confounding variables. However, the population from which Vincenzo selected his mice is not a confounding variable; they all came from the same population. True, the population can be flawed. For instance, it can be very homogeneous and thus fail to reflect how other mice would perform under similar conditions. However, such a flaw is not a confounding variable.

 
Posted : 23/01/2024 2:59 pm
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